Indiana departures

With the confirmation that Austin Etherington and Jeremy Hollowell are leaving the Indiana Hoosiers basketball team, there has been quite a flurry of emotions stirred up again among those in the Hoosier Nation. There are many that want Coach Crean’s head on a stick again (see the past uproar when the Hoosiers had their end-of-season losing streak). What I don’t get is that the fans were unhappy with how the team was playing and now they are unhappy when players that have statistically underproduced are leaving the program? There’s a great analysis of the impact that the departing players will have on the program (got to throw in Marlin’s departure as well) on btownbanners.com and, in all honesty, the team isn’t going to be hurt that badly due to the departures. When you look at the class of recruits that we already have coming in and now add in three more spots to fill on the roster (don’t forget Vonleh’s early departure) with some potentially choice transfers, next year looks like it could be a very exciting year.

Indiana Basketball season 2013-2014 post-mortem

I posted the following on Facebook on Monday, 3/17/14:

The Hoosier basketball season is over and I’m strangely OK with it. I’m going to miss seeing Will Sheehey in the candy-stripes. He has been one of my favorite Hoosiers to don the cream and crimson. I hope the off-season is full of a lot of introspection and soul searching within the program to figure out what caused such a talent-rich squad to fall short on so many occasions. This season is over so the anticipation for next season starts today.

The more I think about this season, I really am sad for Will Sheehey. He has put so much into the Hoosier program over the last four years and it’s unfortunate that he didn’t get to play in the post-season to finish out his Senior year at Indiana. I hope that the underclassmen on the team have learned from Will about how to preserver.

Most folks will now start the talks of if Noah Vonleh will stay or enter the NBA draft. I hope he stays because the Big Ten season showed me that he has a whole lot of growing to do. We saw flashes of things that he can build upon but he needs to get stronger and learn how to play against players more his size. If he dreams of playing in the NBA, he has to learn how to play against guys his size or bigger because almost every team in the NBA has a 7-footer these days. Another reason for him to stay is that it will help the program out a great deal. Cody Zeller was a good player as a freshman but he really became comfortable with the game his sophomore year. Staying that extra year was one of the wisest decisions that Zeller made (second only to choosing to wear the candy-striped pants in the first place) and you can point to a large part of the success of the 2012-2013 team being due to Zeller being down-low.

I am optimistic about the team that the Hoosiers will field next year. We got to see some good growth by our freshmen this year towards the end of the season. I think they are starting to understand how grueling a Big Ten season can be and they’ve experienced the humbling switch from the high school game, where they were each the best of the best, to the Big Ten season, where their talent level is average. Now the question is if they will learn from this and work to improve their skills to take them to the next level when compared to other Big Ten talent. Now that you’re a sophomore, no one cares what you did in high school.

The elephant in the room

There are a lot of folks that are calling for Tom Crean’s head in all of this. I think it’s time to stop, count to 10, and think about some perspective. Last season was a good team with a lot of good talent. They made a great run through the tournament and lost to a very good Syracuse team. All of the Indiana forums this year are covered with folks that thought that last year’s team should have won it all. To them, it’s Tom Crean’s fault that they didn’t hang a banner. Don’t forget that Jim Boeheim is no slouch of a coach. He has averaged a 75% winning percentage over 37 years at the same school. He wins 63% of his tournament games. Loosing to that coach should not be a surprise. He has spent a long time learning how to beat teams and putting what he has learned into practice.

I’ve helped coach youth basketball before and you’re going to have kids that may not follow your game plan or buy into your vision. Some of the season looked like that is exactly what was happening. When that happens, you’ve got to let them fail a bit and turn them over to the team’s leader to let them work together to get everyone on the same page. In Boy Scouts, the adult leaders are there to guide the boys and to provide a safe environment but they are led by their fellow Scouts. It’s fairly obvious when there are no Scouts leading from within. I believe that what we saw for a large part of this season was a group of players that were missing an active leader on the team. Towards the end of the season, the team started to come together better and I think that was due to Sheehey accepting and exerting his role as the leader.  The coach can come up with a game plan but he can’t run the plays from the sidelines. There is a point in time when he hands it over to the players to execute. Hopefully next year we’ll see a team a little more mature and ready to execute the plans drawn up by the coaching staff. I’m also curious to see who is going to be the leader of the team next year. Ferrell is the obvious choice since he’ll be a Junior and runs the offense as the point guard. In the end, we can all call him the leader but it’s a role that he has to accept and embrace for it to be successful.

In Summary

So, how was the season? Well, if you’re an Indiana fan, it felt a little like this:

Eden: a sex slave’s story

Dan:

Proof that absolute evil exists in the world today…

Originally posted on Investik8:

Image

Wearing just their underwear, the girls line up with their backs to the wall, arms by their side, heads down, frozen to the spot. They dare not move.

Their captors walk up and down the line – picking them seemingly at random and tapping them on the shoulder – ‘You, you, you and you… come with me’.

In the back of a warehouse truck, they are driven for miles across the scorching Nevada desert until they reach a hotel. There, they are forced to have sex with up to 25 men one after the other.

This was life for Korean-born American Chong Kim who, at 19 years old, was sold as a domestic sex slave in 1994 to Russian gangsters and held captive for more than two years.

“The clients never came to the warehouse,” she recalled “That was just where we slept. There was nothing there but bed mats…

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